Saturday, February 9, 2013

Weekend Haiku & Limericks


Your challenge: write a haiku or limerick featuring one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days: wind power, Steel Winds, or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku or limericks in the comments, below. Remember the pattern of a haiku is:

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

A limerick is a wee bit more complicated. Here's one description.

Please post your haiku or limerick in the comments, below. 

7 comments:

  1. As climate changes
    so must we. Hoist the windmills!
    And let's stop rowing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi, Patricia, So good to meet you for real last night at Murr's reading!

    A metal tree taller than tamarind,
    like flying fish so oddly finned,
    captures wind with its vanes;
    but we're grievously pained
    if a bird, unaware, become javelined.

    The fin-vanes, we say, must be disciplined
    to be safer when windy they're spinned.
    Don't give us heck no's,
    but look to the tech-knows
    to guard birds AND harvest our wind.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Here's one more verse.

    Old industrial sites are the best.
    If bird safety can meet the hard test,
    that now hopeful tower
    will bring us more power,
    its spinning redeeming its past.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whoo hoo! Well done, Rosemary! Glad to see you back here and even happier to have finally met you in person the other night!

      Delete
  4. Use clean energy
    Even if it doesn't burn
    Look for no downsides

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm thinking of how many years we've been calling for clean energy (1979 no nukes concert: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufo3Hw-5DUM). Maybe at loooong last, the time has come and the change has begun.

    ReplyDelete
  6. In old-time Oklahoma
    wind power pumped the water.
    And on those Spanish hills
    Quixote found wind mills.
    The wind has driven ships
    on many sailing trips.
    The breeze that bears the birds
    can power more than words.
    Smaller may be better
    in any kind of weather.

    ReplyDelete