Friday, August 31, 2012

Weekend Haiku & Limericks


Your challenge: write a haiku or limerick featuring one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days: National Parks subway map, fracking, baby manatees, or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku or limericks in the comments, below. Remember the pattern of a haiku is:

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

A limerick is a wee bit more complicated. Here's one description.

Kindly post your haiku or limerick in the comments, below.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

In case you missed it...

I posted these on Facebook not long ago, but if you haven't joined my page, you may have missed them. (And, considering how weird fb is about how it shares posts, even if you have joined my page, you may have missed them!) 

Enjoy!

I wasn't sure where this National Park Subway map originated from when I posted it on Facebook--turns out its from the clever people at the Sierra Club:




A cool graphic to explain (painlessly!) why fracking is a Very Bad Idea-- from dangersoffracking.com:


Click on the link, and start scrolling down, down, down...



And here's a rescued baby manatee, so cute the folks at Grist can't stand it:

Photo by AMPA.
Maybe I'll see you at www.facebook.com/PKLichen?

Monday, August 27, 2012

Friday, August 24, 2012

Weekend Haiku & Limericks



Your challenge: write a haiku or limerick featuring one of the subjects 
discussed here in the past seven days: hermit crabs or something from 
Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku or limericks in the comments, below. 
Remember the pattern of a haiku is:  

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

A limerick is a wee bit more complicated. Here's one description.
Kindly post your haiku or limerick below!


Thursday, August 23, 2012

Hermit crabs

If any crab could be called endearing, the hermit crab would be. They just don't seem as irritable or menacing as other crabs--at least not toward people. 

Maybe they don't seem crabby because they are not true crabs. Their abdominal legs differ: a hermit's final two pairs of legs are modified to hook into their mobile-home shell--helping, along with the abdomen's coil, to hold the animal in place. 

With their nether bits tucked away, you might wonder how hermit crabs mate (you were wondering this, right?). It's all about timing: hermit crabs have to hook up while a female is molting. 

Itty bitty hermit crabs
Photo by 
Jeremiah Blatz     
Therefore, during breeding season when a male finds a female, he'll grasp the opening of her shell with his small left claw and lug her around for days if he has to, warding off other males with his large claw. 

When the female finally molts, the mating makes them vulnerable and hasty. Both animals pull nearly out of their shells, and the male quickly deposits sperm on the female's abdomen. She'll later use the sperm to fertilize her eggs as they are laid. 

Eventually the hatched young leave their mother's shell in search of suitable lodging in an unoccupied shell--a lifelong occupation as the little animals molt and grow.

Have you ever encountered hermit crabs--little or big--on a beach or tide pool?

Friday, August 17, 2012

Weekend Haiku & Limericks


Your challenge: write a haiku or limerick featuring one of the subjects
discussed here in the past seven days: frogs or the Global Amphibian Blitz,
or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku or limericks in the comments, below. 
Remember the pattern of a haiku is:  

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

A limerick is a wee bit more complicated. 
Here's one description.

Post your haiku or limerick in the comments, below.




Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Seen any good frogs lately?

Amazon Milk Frog photoby IslesPunkFan 


You may have heard of the frog die-offs occurring worldwide, and the scientific wrangling over its cause(s). In response certain species that would go extinct are collected and housed in zoos and other locations, with the hope that they may someday be restored in their natural habitats.
The organization Amphibian Ark is a leader in this effort. 
On a related front, scientists seek help from the public in contributing amphibian observations and photos to a Global Amphibian Blitz database You can help by adding photos of local amphibians--frogs and toads, salamanders and newts--along with dates and locations. So far 1325 species have been recorded. Can you add more?

Monday, August 13, 2012

Monday's Nature Quote

We simply need that wild country available to us, even if we never do more than drive to its edge and look in. For it can be a means of reassuring ourselves of our sanity as creatures, a part of the geography of hope. 
~ Wallace Stegner
photo by Michael McDonough on Flickr

Friday, August 10, 2012

Weekend Haiku & Limericks


Your challenge: write a haiku or limerick featuring one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days: clouds and appreciation thereof, or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku or limericks in the comments, below. Remember the pattern of a haiku is:  

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

A limerick is a wee bit more complicated. Here's one description.

Post your haiku or limerick in the comments, below.

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Appreciating the Cloud Appreciation Society


The Cloud Appreciation Society's website has its cloud identification pages, its forum for cloud discussions and its cloud photo gallery, but my favorite page is the Cloud Manifesto, which reads:



WE BELIEVE that clouds are unjustly maligned
and that life would be immeasurably poorer without them.
Cloud Icon
We think that they are Nature’s poetry, 
and the most egalitarian of her displays, since 
everyone can have a fantastic view of them.
Cloud Icon
We pledge to fight ‘blue-sky thinking’ wherever we find it. 
Life would be dull if we had to look up at 
cloudless monotony day after day.
Cloud Icon
We seek to remind people that clouds are expressions of the 
atmosphere’s moods, and can be read like those of 
a person’s countenance.
Cloud Icon
Clouds are so commonplace that their beauty is often overlooked. 
They are for dreamers and their contemplation benefits the soul. 
Indeed, all who consider the shapes they see in them will save 
on psychoanalysis bills.
Cloud Icon
And so we say to all who’ll listen:
Look up, marvel at the ephemeral beauty, and live life with your head in the clouds!

And don't miss the Society's cloud shop for all your cloud earring, badges, tights, cuff links, mug and t-shirts needs.     

A bad hair day over Scotland; from Clouds That Look Like Things
You'll also find the book Clouds That Look Like Things (how is that not on the New York Time's bestseller list?!) 

How about it? Are you a cloud appreciator?

Monday, August 6, 2012

Monday's Nature Quote

by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
Camping: Nature’s way of promoting the motel industry.
~ Dave Barry

Friday, August 3, 2012

Weekend Haiku & Limericks


Your challenge: write a haiku or limerick featuring one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days: frogs, 7000 amphibians, or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku or limericks in the comments, below. Remember the pattern of a haiku is:  

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

A limerick is a wee bit more complicated. Here's one description.

Ribbet! Post your haiku or limerick in the comments, below.

Thursday, August 2, 2012

7000 Kinds of Amphibians!

Not the Peruvian glassfrog, because its photo
is copyrighted.
This is a paperweight frog posing on my carpet.
In celebration of the discovery of the 7000th species of amphibian on our big round wet ball o' Earth, here's a song guaranteed to knock "Call Me Maybe" right out of your noggin: "7000 Kinds of Amphibians" by the Wiggly Tendrils.  


Who keeps track of all those critters? AmphibiaWeb is doing the counting.


And which one is the 7000th? A glassfrog in Peru, Centrolene sabini.


And doesn't that make you feel good--to know that frogs and toads and newts and salamanders are still being discovered?