Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Happy Cardboardween

www.evilmadscientist.com/2006/crocodile-costume

Yes, it’s a Halloween Cardboard Costume Challenge, courtesy of a blogger in Japan, who would really like to see everyone use less plastic, please.

Amber’s arguments: “Cardboard is a wonderful material to adapt to holiday celebrations year round because it’s abundant, economical (usually free), recycle-able, and incredibly versatile.”  

For those whose imaginations stop at a robot constructed from boxes, Amber has some photo suggestions. She also welcomes folks to visit her blog for weekly tutorials, like this one for an extravagant cardboard mustache, and to sign up to participate in her Costume Challenge.

Even if you’re not planning to wear a costume this Halloween, you might want to visit to see children’s table and chairs or other cardboard projects. (Bam! Take that, plastic!)

thecardboardcollective.com/2012/10/07/how-to-make-a-cardboard-mustache/

12 comments:

  1. Very cool looking stuff. I do use cardboard from time to time to make things because it saves me some money and easy to work with, never thought about the green aspect. I have always liked the mummy costume or any other outlandish dress up from old clothes just waiting for one more chance to be useful.

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  2. I really like that little table and chair set. The blog said it was easy to make, and so light their one-year-old could move it around. Cardboard furniture...who knew?

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  3. I love the creativity of the cardboard approach. I've never thought much about cardboard....and am actually quite surprised to read that some people are actually 'obsessed' with it, but LOVE any and all alternatives to plastic. Cool.

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  4. Since this is Halloween I have a horror story to tell about cardboard bricks.

    One day long ago when eBay was still a very wild place and you could get a brick in place of the merchandise that your won and no refund, I won, lol, oh yeah, I won, a bunch of little metal diecast star war figurines.

    When the box arrived and it was a big box my joy soon turned to horror as it was filled with un-assembled cardboard bricks. Each brick was cheerfully colored, high points highlighted, really nice print job, complete with dotted lines as to where to fold and bend the tabs so as to assemble the coolest looking pile of cardboard bricks.

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  5. One Halloween I made a costume for my niece who was about 4 at the time. I used a cardboard box and cut a hole in the center of it to create a table; paper tablecloth stapled to it, added paperplate, papercup, napkin plastic dinnerware. Then we put it over my niece. We made her into the centerpiece-red cheeks and a head full of silk flowers. She was so cute.

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  6. So I said to myself, "Self, Let's do this!!!" Then I looked at the pictures. Hokey smokes. There are works there that should be in a Museum of Modern art. How intimidating. I guess I could make a dragon head just for myself...you know...to answer the door on Halloween, but somehow going to the door with a badly painted/cut/wopperjawed box on my head seems a bit creepy. Great post, though. What a fun idea, if I weren't so lazy and untalented.

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  7. Hmmm, maybe a paper bag would be a good place to start, Barb?

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  8. Ah, cute and she has a clever auntie!

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  9. The cruelty! Man, I hadn't really considered how far eBay has come...

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  10. With your artistic ability, you could make some real works of art... but I suppose drawing, painting, writing books and a blog--oh, and your day job--already keep you a bit busy.

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  11. My daughter and her partner have made their halloween costume from cardboard: They're going as a cardboard binder full of women.

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  12. Timely AND recyclable!

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