Wednesday, August 31, 2011

WASH ME!!!!



Whadda concept. Reverse graffiti uses grimy urban surfaces as canvasses—creating art by washing images and words onto soot-covered tunnels and filthy walls. 

Authorities are not quite sure what to make of this—can you arrest someone for cleaning the city?  When Brazilian artist Alexandre Orion created a mural of skulls in a Sao Paolo tunnel to remind drivers of the environmental impact of car emissions, authorities responded by cleaning the wall.  Orion then clean-graffitied the other side.  And according to inhabit.com, the authorities responded by cleaning every tunnel in Sao Paolo.

Reverse graffiti. What do you think?   

Monday, August 29, 2011

Monday Nature Quote

Luther Standing Bear
The old people came literally to love the soil and they sat or reclined on the ground with a feeling of being close to a mothering power. It was good for the skin to touch the earth, and the old people liked to remove their moccasins and walk with bare feet on the sacred earth. Their tipis were built upon the earth and their alters were made of earth. The birds that flew in the air came to rest upon the earth and it was the final abiding place of all things that lived and grew. The soil was soothing, strengthening, cleansing, and healing.

--Luther Standing Bear, quoted by T.C. McLuhan in Touch the Earth: A Self-Portrait of Indian Existence

And the winner is...


Thanks to all who entered the scavenger hunt--and congratulations to the winner, Scherrie, whose entry was randomly chosen by my lovely assistant!

My thanks also to these participating bloggers:

Slugyard
Murrmurrs
Wanderin' Weeta
Wild Fidalgo
The Metropolitan Field Guide
Orca Watcher
Wild Pacific Northwest
Rock Paper Lizard
They're a lot of fun even when they're not participating in a scavenger hunt. (Click on each to link to their sites. No telling what they'll write about next!)

Saturday, August 27, 2011

Scavenger hunt!!!

It's our first-ever bloggers scavenger hunt! Here's how it works: below you'll find 8 questions and a list of 8 Pacific Northwest blog sites that hold the answers to those questions.

Answer each question, and provide the name of the blogger or blog where you found it, and then send your answers to patriciaklichen at gmail dot com by midnight tomorrow (Sunday) evening (Pacific time). A winner will be randomly chosen from those entries with correct answers. Whaddya win? In addition to the glory and admiration of your peers, the winner will receive an autographed copy of Kidnapping the Lorax!

Ready? Here are the questions--remember to include the answer and the name of the blogger or blog where you found it:

1. What creatures are "all about real estate"?


2. What is J41's other name?


3. What can happen over time to large-animal species living on islands?


4. What appeared "like a zombie through the fog"?


5. What made the ground 'move' two weeks ago at Mount St Helens?


6. Spots on underwater photos could be dust/dirt or what animals? 


7. What is the kite hill made from?


8. What has many short tentacles, each tipped with a sticky globule of mucilage?



Here are the blogs where you will scavenge for your answers (each is a link--just click on it):

Slugyard

Murrmurrs

Wanderin' Weeta

Wild Fidalgo

The Metropolitan Field Guide

Orca Watcher

Wild Pacific Northwest

Rock Paper Lizard


Once you've got your answers (and blog or blogger names) send them to: patriciaklichen at gmaildotcom
Let the hunt begin!

Friday, August 26, 2011

Haiku Friday

Come back tomorrow to participate in our first PNW bloggers scavenger hunt.

But today your challenge is to write a haiku featuring one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days: skunks, tomorrow's scavenger hunt, or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku in the comments, below. Remember the pattern of a haiku is:

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

Tomorrow we scavenge; today we haiku!

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Master Skunk

Cute lil' stinker
Photo by Out at Bob's
Like a kung-fu master, the skunk travels peaceably through the world, secure in the knowledge of its own powers, and employing its weapon only as a last resort.

Before a skunk sprays, it gives its adversary an opportunity to back down and save face. A threatened striped skunk will arch its back and raise its tail to better advertise its warning colors, it may chatter its teeth, and when really worked up, it may stamp the ground with its forefeet. By the time it curls its body in a U-shape and completely raises its tail facing the intruder, it is too late.

Twin nipples usually tucked into the anus are everted and, looking over its shoulder, the provoked skunk lets fly with an amazingly well-aimed shot of a sulfurous N-butyl mercaptan in an oily, amber fluid. This can travel over 15 feet, and can be employed either as a mist or in jets, as the situation requires. And the skunk can direct the spray not only over either shoulder but also to either side, in front of or behind itself, and even above itself in order to hit its target--which is its opponent's face.

Have you (or perhaps a 4-legged friend) ever met or tested the patience of the peaceful warrior?

(Come back for a visit on Saturday for our first-ever blogger scavenger hunt. See more details in the previous post.)

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Scavenger hunt clues here on Sat, Aug 27 at 9:00 AM (Pacific time)

Hey, let's try something new: a Pacific Northwest Bloggers Scavenger Hunt! 
Here's the plan: this Saturday, Aug 27 at 9:00 AM, I'll post a series of questions along with a list of PNW bloggers. Your challenge will be to visit the blogs and, using the posts found there, answer each of the scavenger hunt questions correctly. Then you'll send your responses to me at patriciaklichen@gmail.com--the winner of a random drawing of correct actions will receive (what else?) a free, autographed copy of my novel Kidnapping the Lorax.

You can read the reviews for the novel here, or see a sample by clicking the appropriate tab at the top of this page.


SO be sure to check in here this SATURDAY, AUG 27--the deadline for responses will be Sunday night--Aug 28--at midnight. (You don't need to live in the PNW--or even the USA--to win!)

Monday, August 22, 2011

Monday's Nature Quote

For a great tree death comes as a gradual transformation. Its vitality ebbs slowly. Even when life has abandoned it entirely it remains a majestic thing. ... Alone among living things it retains its character and dignity after death. Plants wither; animals disintegrate. But a dead tree may be as arresting, as filled with personality, in death as it is in life. Even in its final moments, when the massive trunk lies prone and it has moldered into a ridge covered with mosses and fungi, it arrives at a fitting and noble end. It enriches and refreshes the earth. And later, as part of other green and growing things, it rises again.

--Edwin Way Teale, Dune Boy, the Early Years of a Naturalist

Friday, August 19, 2011

Haiku Friday

Your challenge: write a haiku featuring one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days: moving forests to accommodate climate change or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku in the comments, below. Remember the pattern of a haiku is:

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

Go ahead! Haiku!

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Moving the forest for the trees



It’s come to this: now we’re moving forests to accommodate climate change.   
Recognizing the threat that continuing weather changes pose to British Columbia’s 9 billion dollar wood and paper products industry, the Canadian government is experimenting with moving its forests up to 200 miles beyond their native range. 
The Ministry of Forests and Range has been experimenting by extending the range of 15 species of timber species. Research by the Future Forest Ecosystems Initiative has led to a plan to plant 250,000 larch seedlings in areas that scientists believe will be hospitable to that species as climate change accelerates.
Humans are nothing if not adaptable. It remains to be seen whether our forests will be as accommodating.
What do you think of this attempt?

Monday, August 15, 2011

Monday's Nature Quote

The great number of living species on the earth, hundreds of thousands of kinds of animals and plants, are arranged over the planet, not at random, but in organized and structured communities of living things.... Each community is distinct, the species within each are tied together in intricate networks of energy flows or pathways of chemical raw materials from soil, air, and water through various plants to various animals. Disturbance of any part of a community affects all parts.

--Raymond Dasmann, "An Environment Fit for People" Public Affair pamphlet #421, Public Affairs Committee, N.Y.

www.vogliaditerra.com/

Friday, August 12, 2011

Haiku Friday

Your challenge: write a haiku featuring one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days: PeopleTowels, colorful ants, or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku in the comments, below. Remember the pattern of a haiku is:

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

Haiku on!

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Eco-groovy or eco-nerdy? You be the judge.

At my workplace, like most in America, paper towels are offered in the bathrooms. I've often thought about bringing my own hand-towel to avoid using a (seemingly-) endless supply of paper towel, but have I followed through? Nope.

But I'm about to...because I've discovered PeopleTowels.  These handy-dandy little towels are made of 100% organic cotton and eco-friendly dyes. They dry quickly and each has a hangtag so you can hang it to dry between uses. Check this out:


So, use your own towel and save trees, reduce landfill waste, cut CO2 emissions and conserve water? I'm convinced--I went on the website, and from the designs offered, I chose these 3:




How about you? If you think that PeopleTowels are eco-groovy, you can get 10% off when you buy two or more towels online --just use this "promo code": ambassadorr4eaw

Do you think it's time to BYOTowel?

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

You are what you eat

I don't know what kind of ants these are, but they have transparent abdomens and are found in India--and the photos are so cool, I just have to share:


These were photographed by Dr. Mohamed Babu after his wife noticed the white abdomens of the ants that sipped spilled milk in their kitchen.

Dr Babu set colored sugar water on paraffin in his garden (see the trees reflected in the droplets?). The paraffin allowed the drops to keep their shape as the ants partook.

Some of the ants wandered from drop to drop, creating different colors within their bodies.
Dr Babu found that the ants preferred yellow and green. I'd go for red, myself. 


You can read more about Dr. Babu's efforts in the Daily Mail Online, or check out a sonnet about the ants (which tipped me off to this story) at Suppertime Sonnets.

Monday, August 8, 2011

Monday's Nature Quote



What has gone wrong, probably, is that we have failed to see ourselves as part of a large and indivisible whole.  For too long, we have based our lives on a primitive feeling that our "God-given" role was to have 'dominion over the fish of the sea and over the fowl of the air and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.'  We have failed to understand that the earth does not belong to us, but we to the earth.
                                                                                                                --Rolf Edberg



Saturday, August 6, 2011

Videos you shouldn't miss

I'd posted these videos on my Facebook page, but it occurs to me that I really ought to share the wealth here. You may have seen these--they've gone viral, I think--but here they are anyway because you shouldn't miss them:

   Octopus changing color: betcha can't spot it before it reveals itself.





  Freeing a humpback whale from a fishing net: This requires a bit of patience at first--as well as willingness to view a guy in a red speedo--but it's worth it.





  Dancing bear: Getting down in the woods.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

Haiku Friday

Your challenge: write a haiku featuring one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days: book festivals, hummingbirds, or something from Monday's nature quote. Feel free to mine the comments, too.

Post your haiku in the comments, below. Remember the pattern of a haiku is:

First, 5 syllables,
the second line has seven.
And 5 at the end.

Post your haiku in the comments!

 

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

An order of sugar water--hold the red dye please


No dye, please!
Photo by Mr. T in DC
 Lucky Americans--both North and South Americans--we have hummingbirds. I was surprised to learn that these zippy little birds are not found elsewhere in the world.

The birdfeeders I most often see hanging outside homes here in the US are those for hummingbirds. And most often the feeders contain an unnecessary side order of red dye. The hummers who feed there end up processing a lot of red dye; whether this is directly harmful to the birds is under debate, but it's clear that this chemical is not needed in their diet. The feeders themselves are nearly always colored red, and this is enough of an attractant without the addition of a potentially harmful chemical. Likewise, there's no need to buy commercial products that contain preservatives as well as the dye--a homemade syrup of table sugar and water is better for the little beasties. (Recipe/instructions are easily found online.)

In addition to nectar, hummers feed on insects and spiders. They procure these on the wing, or pluck them out of webs or from inside plants.

But helping them out with sugar water is a lovely gift to the wild things--just hold the dye.

Monday, August 1, 2011

Monday's Nature Quote

Mount Baker from Ptarmigan RidgeTrail
photo by 
iwona_kellie 
"We’re not so poor that we have to spend our wilderness or so rich that we can afford to."
--Newton Drury