Saturday, April 30, 2011

Seed bombs & guerilla gardening

Sunday, May 1st is the fifth annual International Sunflower Guerrilla Gardening Day. Guerilla gardeners just want to share the greenery--they fill abandoned and barren spaces with seeds or plants, pretty much without bothering to ask permission from anyone. In fact, some of these secret gardeners act in the dead of night--a derelict area is replaced by a bed of flowers or edibles before the sun rises.  The gardeners act locally and think globally: they share their adventures online from Italy, Romania, Sweden, Austria, France, Switzerland, New Zealand, Australia, England, Canada, Ireland, Germany, and the U.S.  


On May 1, the flower du jour is the sunflower, and nearly 3,000 on Facebook worldwide have pledged to plant.  


One of the tools of the trade is the seed bomb--balls made out of compost and clay that encase wildflower or other seeds.  They're thrown into neglected open spaces (over a chain-link fence, say), and there they sit, the seeds protected from drying out or being eaten by birds, until the next rain when the clay breaks down and the compost offers instant nutrients.


So, how about it? Know any abandoned, neglected spots that could use a sunflower (or a few dozen)?  
Join in the cause: resistance is fertile.

11 comments:

  1. This is beyond cool---and way exciting as to its prospects for the future. Need to register anywhere? or just do it? Boy do we have clay in Georgia and I have a super duper compost complex in the wayback yard (five piles, each in a different stage of decomposition)---it's a seed bomb waiting to happen!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh, you can just go forth and happily bomb, but they'd love it if you joined the Facebook page or posted photos on their website: www.guerrillagardening.org

    ReplyDelete
  3. And I'd love to hear about it too, if you get something happening at what sounds like the seed-bomb capital!

    ReplyDelete
  4. This sounds like a lot of fun. Too bad I don't have a spare second these days. I could totally get into doing this.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Guerrilla gardening equals senseless beauty and random acts of kindness. There are a couple of patches of daffodils on campus that seem to have been randomly planted. I smile every time I see them. Now I will be on the lookout for sunflowers! Would planting morning glories next to a chainlink fence be a good thiing, or a bad thing?

    ReplyDelete
  6. This reminds me of the days of "Flower Power" and Allen Ginsberg's Sunflower Sutra. I love the idea of guerrilla gardening. My favorite kind of radicalism, the utter anarchy of seeds!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Lisa--yes! This is right up your alley! Maybe during the winter rains you can craft seed bombs as well as stories...

    Roxie--Morning glories = BAD in the PNW. Much as I love them, they are an invasive species here.

    Robin--glad to see you here despite computer difficulties. "The utter anarchy of seeds"--you've got such a way with words!

    ReplyDelete
  8. You can come bomb my yard any time you feel the need....

    ReplyDelete
  9. I've thougth of doing this so many times. What a great idea!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Guerilla gardeners just want to share the greenery--they fill abandoned and barren spaces Pest Control Review Spring Texas with seeds or plants, pretty much without bothering to ask permission from anyone.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Guerilla gardeners just want to share the greenery--they fill abandoned and barren spaces with seeds or plants, pretty much without bothering to ask permission from anyone. this site

    ReplyDelete